In the News...

Lindsay's research and expertise in history and international affairs, with a focus on socio-cultural, political, and diplomatic issues, provide behind-the-scenes stories and larger context for understanding today's globalized sports world. Updated portfolio here.

The Washington Post

Joie des hoops: the hidden history of franco-American diplomacy

Gonzaga basketball's french connection

Why the 2024 Olympic Games are a victory for globalism

  Roads & Kingdoms

Roads & Kingdoms

Living to the rhythm of the race

 CNN International

CNN International

Skiers count the cost of living 'White Circus' dream

  The New Yorker

The New Yorker

French women are taking over soccer

  Sports Illustrated

Sports Illustrated

France at Euro 2016: Complex aspects of following Les Bleus

 Vice Sports

Vice Sports

high hopes and olympic hoop dreams in france

  The New Yorker

The New Yorker

Basketball, which was invented by the Y.M.C.A. educator James Naismith in 1891, is one of the few global sports with American roots, and U.S. players have long dominated the game. While this is still the case, an increasing number of N.B.A. stars come from abroad. France is not typically perceived as a basketball breeding ground, but only Canada and Serbia have sent more men to the league; five Frenchmen entered this year’s playoffs.

 CNN International

CNN International

In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo massacre, the idea of liberté, égalité, fraternité in France might have seemed irretrievably fractured. But try telling that to the thousands of kids and teenagers playing football in the Paris Île-de-France region week-in and week-out.

Football is one area of French life where the nation's founding principles are very alive and kicking.

  New York Times

New York Times

Four years ago, Les Bleus, the French national soccer team, went on strike in South Africa. The incident capped the team’s self-destruction in the 2010 World Cup. In the aftermath, the players were called undereducated “PlayStation junkies” who were too individualistic to serve the nation.

Much has changed, yet today the French hesitate to re-embrace the team. A poll conducted for the magazine France Football found that only 20 percent of French people surveyed in late April had a positive view of Les Bleus.